5 Ideas For The Interested This Week

“The people in my songs are all me.” – Bob Dylan

Forget better.

There is no definitive better.

Better is a judgment call and what’s better for one person is worse for another.

Instead, be different.

My newsletter isn’t “better” than other newsletters.

It’s different.

And that’s enough.

Now, on to this week’s ideas…

1. Don’t Think Outside The Box. Create The Box.

“Freedom doesn’t make it easier to create — constraints do.”

Think outside the box isn’t good advice.

In this post, I explain why and how doing makes the creative process easier and more effective.

If nothing else, check out the first couple paragraphs where I share an example that may change how you approach your next creation.

Related: .

2. Seven Google Docs Features You May Not Know Exist

“As a writer who’s written thousands of articles and worked with thousands of clients, here are the the top features I personally use in Google Docs that you might not know about.”

If you use Google Docs, this is a must-read.

Neville Medhora shares including how to use Google Keep to easily insert saved snippets, type with your voice, and access an automated outline of your document.

Related: .

3. Do The Real Thing

“Real things have risk. They have the possibility of failure. They have frustration. They force you to confront the possibility that maybe you just aren’t good enough.”

It’s so easy to convince yourself you’re working toward something when you’re actually just avoiding the real work.

Scott H. Young explains the difference and encourages you to and remember that sometimes nothing is better than something, the hard way is the easy way, and if you’re not sure what the real thing is — just ask.

Btw, I found this in .

Related: .

4. How To Develop A Social Media Content Strategy Inspired By The Success Of People You Admire

“Part of an artist’s job is social media.”

This one is written for musicians, but is applicable to anyone trying to use social media to grow an audience.

Amber Horsburgh breaks down and includes a step-by-step plan you can use to analyze what works for other artists you admire and use that to inspire and influence your own approach.

Related: .

5. Set Up Your Own Creative War Room

“The room has no windows and (crucially) no computers. The walls are covered in whiteboards and the lights are in an early 20th century style.”

I’ll warn you up front: You probably won’t be able to replicate the example in this post.

But, Cal Newport’s suggestion that you and the example he shares based on Winston Churchill’s WWII war room bunker is likely to inspire you to carve out a little creative space in your own orbit and that’s probably a good idea.

Btw, I found this link in .

Related: .

My Final Words Of The Week

When I was young, I tore a Nike ad out of a Sports Illustrated magazine and pinned it on my bedroom wall.

It stayed there for years.

Through high school, through the summers when I was home from college, and it was even still there years later when I’d come home for a visit as an adult.

Looking back on it, it almost feels like something I’d write now which makes me realize it had a huge influence on how I see the world.

Still does.

Something tells me you’ll find it inspiring too.

Have a great week.

Josh

PS — If you dig this newsletter, I’d love for you to share it with others who might enjoy it.

Thanks!